Covid and social distancing and diabetes and … and … I’m still exercising

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As you are reading this, most of America is under some kind of stay-at-home, shelter-in-place, safer-at-home restriction.

Yet many of us have diabetes.

And many of us have to exercise in order to help manage our diabetes.

Well, let me tell you what I am doing. It is springtime in Tennessee and we are now often experiencing days that are warm and full of sunshine. And we are experiencing days that are a bit cooler but still perfect … like any springtime season.

My wife and I have been getting out on our street and walking religiously. We also live near a greenway that we frequent. It can all be done with appropriate social distancing guidelines. (that’s me on a greenway in the photo above)

And the walking decreases my insulin resistance.  And this benefits type 2 diabetics.

But the entire point of this is that there is a way to get off the couch even during a dang quarantine.

If ever I needed an excuse to not exercise, a national pandemic would be one, wouldn’t it? I mean, everyone would understand, right?

But if I didn’t exercise during this national emergency, here’s what would happen:

  1. a key tool in my diabetes management would vanish
  2. my mood would darken
  3. because my mood might darken, depression might set in
  4. because depression might set in, that would adversely affect diabetes (see my post on this)

Exercise brings hope.

Let hope back in!


#coronavirus #covid19 #covid #socialdistancing #YoungerNextYear #ChrisCrowley

How to exercise during a pandemic … or … Covid-19, get outta my way!

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First and foremost, especially during a pandemic, you have to exercise!

Inactivity increases disease risk!!

Let me repeat this: inactivity increases disease risk!

Covid-19 cannot be just another excuse for those of us who already hate to exercise, to avoid walking, running, biking, swimming, etc etc A pandemic cannot be a new momentum-buster, standing in the way of activities that help manage your diabetes.

I hate to exercise.

I have diabetes.

Therefore I must exercise.

During this current crisis, here’s what I have been doing:

On my street, I have been getting out at least twice a day for walks. I have wireless headphones (Beats) and I listen to an audio-book that I purchase through Audible. This walking routine can be done easily with social distancing needs still being met.

I also have a weight bench in my basement (barbells, etc) that I have started using every other day. I put a podcast on that I enjoy and jump into my routine.

Exercise helps lower insulin resistance. Exercise helps your A1C numbers. Exercise is not a nice-to-have, it is mandatory for those of us with blood sugar issues.

I know not everyone has a convenient street on which to walk. And I understand that gyms are to be avoided.

But be creative! You can figure this out!

Just make sure covid-19 doesn’t stop you from this extremely important activity of daily exercise.

#covid19 #covid-19 #coronavirusandexercise #diabetesandcovid19 #exercisehelps #ChrisCrowley

(author’s note: if you enjoy this blog, please purchase my book on Amazon! “42 Ways to Motivate the Sedentary Diabetic to Actually Exercise” … and leave a review on Amazon if you enjoy it!)

 

Video onboard! How to squeeze in a 20 minute walk between business meetings

Hi there everyone!

I had a noon meeting in Franklin, TN yesterday that lasted an hour. I had not gotten any exercise in because, well, I hate to exercise.

And inertia battles me every single day.

But because of type 2 diabetes, I must exercise.

So I decided to take a 20 minute walk on Main Street in Franklin which is an extraordinarily picturesque walk. Plus it was 65 degrees in February.

It was fun, I enjoyed it, I didn’t even notice the walk because I was so absorbed in the sights and sounds.

Diabetic conditions can be improved through regular exercise, like this.

If we enjoy our exercise, we are more likely to do it.

If we pick an exercise that we loathe, odds are that we might not do it. (I know myself, I assure you, I won’t)

Get off the couch and out of your office today … I’ll bet you also can find a way to squeeze in a 20 minute walk somehow, some way, even today.

#diabetes #diabetics #walking #exercisehelpsdiabetics #FranklinTN

(Author’s note: Click HERE to check out my book on Amazon “42 Ways to Motivate the Sedentary Diabetic to Actually Exercise” … this would make a great gift for friends and family who need encouragement to exercise)

Mo-mo-mo-momentum!

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When I was younger, I would hang-glide in cow pastures. (You immediately see a myriad of issues with this, I suspect).

I would run with the hang-glider until I had enough momentum that the air would lift me off the ground into the sky. It was like magic to me. Momentum always propelled me to new heights. (side note: upon landing, I had to make sure I missed the cows and their by-products!)

I hate to exercise.

I must exercise in order to control my type 2 diabetes. Exercise and diet are my two main tools. And they work amazingly.

But I have found that momentum is a key to overcoming the inertia that keeps us from getting off the couch (or out of our office) and exercising.

Here’s what momentum looks like:

You walk one day for 5 minutes. Day 2 you walk for 5 minutes. Day 3 you drive to the gym to climb on the stair step machine. Day 4 you walk for 10 minutes. Momentum will now deposit you into some kind of activity on day 5 and beyond.

Voila!

Your hang-glider will now be airborne!

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Rock, paper, scissors … depression, diabetes, walking

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I was sitting in a graduate-level psychology class once upon a time when I heard a jaw-dropping fact – if you walk 20 minutes a day, the anti-depressive effects of that walk will equal any, I repeat ANY, antidepressant on the market today.

The professor saw the class’s incredulity and proceeded to show scholarly study after scholarly study where this was proven out.

Now, the truly amazing part is that when you combine walking, with an antidepressant and talk therapy, you definitely have the most powerful tool to combat depression.

Read more

Give your diabetes a Christmas present!

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Loads of carbs you have to avoid … tons of desserts you must dodge … sugar canes you have to turn your back on … co-workers leaving brownies and sprinkled cookies on your desk, ok, ok, you get the picture.

If you are a diabetic, this is a tough time of year … potentially. If you are a diabetic, this is whitewater … potentially.

But I have a suggestion … I have a tip on how to turn the holidays into a healthy time of year for the diabetic.

Remember this blog is about overcoming inertia and getting out the front door to actually exercise? And remember that exercise is a key to managing our diabetes? (and remember that fantastic book I wrote regarding this?)

Well, we are going to defeat diabetes in the holiday season by … drum roll … taking at least two short walks a day, every day. If your fitness level has you way above this, then continue that but throw an extra session a day in. Double it.

You will be fighting depression … you will be managing your diabetes … your cells will absorb more of your blood glucose thereby leaving less in your bloodstream. And this is important for those with type 2 diabetes.

And let this doubling of exercise be your gift to yourself … and a gift to your diabetes!

Sound too tough? Cry to me at terry.blankenship@outlook.com 🙂

 

Biltmore helped me exercise, yep, that’s right

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Now, you may be wondering … how in the world could Biltmore House in Asheville, NC contribute to my exercise which contributes to my diabetes management?

A little background first … Biltmore House is the nation’s largest private home with over 230 rooms and measuring 175,000 square feet (whoa!). I live in Nashville, TN and have never been to Biltmore but it’s an easy trip there and back. It is decorated for Christmas so we went and had a fabulous time. Here’s how it helped my diabetes … Read more

Boot camp, ridiculous or a game changer?

bootcamp

Tom was a person who was a retired executive with type II diabetes. He has never been active, always allowing his career to crowd virtually everything else out including self-care. So if you were to look for the word sedentary in the dictionary, Tom’s picture would appear (right beside mine, of course … hey, yours might be in there too).

He heard about a boot camp at his local fitness center. At the urging of his spouse, he took a deep breath and called the center inquiring about the boot camp. The person on the other end must’ve been a great salesman because Tom found himself at day one of boot camp about a week later. Read more